Property & Estate Planning Lawyers

Call 1300 600 536 for more information or to arrange an appointment

BUY & SELL REAL ESTATE

Residential & Commercial

Your peace of mind is our priority

Whether you are an Owner selling a property, a first home Buyer, upgrading to a better…

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RETAIL & COMMERCIAL LEASING

Landlords & Tenants

Landlords & Tenants

Landlords and Tenants of retail shops and commercial premises need relevant and specific advice when…

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TRUSTS & ASSET PROTECTION

Controlling (without owning) Assets

The Family Discretionary Trust

Family Trusts are a well established and popular component of the…

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WILLS & ESTATE PLANNING

Be prepared for the unexpected!

Prepare & Plan

We all make plans for the future – goals we wish to achieve.  But the best plans can go sideways when…

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WHY CHOOSE US?

LATEST NEWS AND POSTS

September 2017

Why do lawyers question your sanity?

By | September 6th, 2017|

When you meet with a lawyer to discuss your estate planning needs, the lawyer may need to verify that you have the mental capacity to make decisions regarding your personal and legal affairs. This doesn't mean that the lawyer thinks that you may not be of sound mind. What it does mean is that the lawyer is trying to protect you and your beneficiaries from having your wishes challenged by someone else at some future time!

August 2017

Help your family make critical health decisions

By | August 27th, 2017|

During severe illness, you may be unconscious or otherwise unable to communicate your wishes - at the very time when many critical decisions need to be made. You have the ability to help your family make critical decisions about the medical treatment you receive - and ease the emotional trauma encountered when making life and death decisions.

Who can make decisions for you when you can’t

By | August 27th, 2017|

A General Power of Attorney authorises someone to act on your behalf, but ceases to operate where you lose mental capacity due to accident or illness.  A spouse, friend or relative would be unable to act on your behalf or assist you with any of your personal, legal or financial affairs unless you had signed an Enduring Power of Attorney.

Dying without a Will: Who Gets What?

By | August 24th, 2017|

Where you pass away without a valid Will, you are classified as dying 'intestate'.  Where your Will doesn’t deal with all of your estate assets, you are classified as dying 'partially intestate'.  If intestate, your assets are distributed according to a rigid set of rules.  The consequences can be disastrous for your family, as those people closest to you could miss out entirely.